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Day 6: Climate Action Network: Latest Developments at COP21

December 5, 2015

A revised document was only released in the form of draft conclusions during CAN’s press briefing. In view of the late availability of this text, the press briefing mainly discussed happenings as of 2am (CET). Watch the webcast here to find out more.

can 5 dec

Facilitator: Ria Voorhaar (CAN International)

Speakers: Liz Gallagher (E3G), Brandon Wu (Action Aid USA), Sandeep Chamling Rai (WWF)

Liz stated that there has been movement amongst the negotiating blocks. On mitigation, although the text started to look better, Venezuela and Saudi Arabia opposed decarbonisation and the long term goal. On the least mature area of the negotiations – the ambition mechanism, developed and emerging nations prefer an assessment of the current status of emissions based on past progress. This is compared to AILAC, the Climate Vulnerable Forum and LDCs, which prefer a more forward-looking assessment. Liz also pointed out that the EU, AILAC and AOSIS would like a start date for stock-taking prior to 2020. This is to provide an assessment of INDCs before the emissions reductions target kicks in. Otherwise, there would be no way to strengthen the INDCs till 2030.

indc

Sandeep noted that there is a general consensus that adaptation should be a common goal. However, there has been pushback from some industrialised countries to detach the adaptation goal from the temperature goal. This is opposed to the G77 and civil society, which would want to see both goals linked.

Brandon stressed that finance should be seen as a core part of the UN framework and a key driver of a strong outcome. Thus far, countries have either been recipients or donors but not both. Nonetheless, given China’s US$3.1 billion contribution through the South-South Fund, a new system may be explored. He recognised that equity is crucial in unlocking ambition. This could be achieved with an objective system, in which a country’s ability to contribute is based on specific indicators like historical responsibility and capacity.

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